Hollywood Party

Hrundi V. Bakshi ad un party che si chiama vita
to—tomorrow:

Trams excepted © James Paul 2014
My work is here @ redbubble store & here 
My music is @ iTunes  & SoundCloud 
Donate to my study 
…or just buy me a coffee here

to—tomorrow:

Trams excepted © James Paul 2014

My work is here @ redbubble store & here 

My music is @ iTunes  & SoundCloud 

Donate to my study 

…or just buy me a coffee here

needforcolor:

[Carmelo Bene in “Uno contro tutti”, 1995]

needforcolor:

[Carmelo Bene in “Uno contro tutti”, 1995]

(via el-hereje)

slowlyeden:

Art history meme | 3/8 artists

Vilhelm Hammershøi (1864–1916)

Born in Copenhagen, Denmark, Hammershøi is known for his poetic, low-key interiors. Many of these feature his wife, Ida Ilsted, often seen from behind, and many were painted in their homes in Copenhagen.

Throughout his career, Hammershøi remained independent of any group or movement: a fact which contributed to his work being largely forgotten until relatively recently. While their limited colour-palettes give Hammershøi’s works an air of calm elegance, they can also evoke a sense of mystery and even tension, and, despite their understated aesthetic, they were enough to unsettle the artistic establishment of Hammershøi’s day.

(via beethovenissimo)

de-es-ce-ha:

Dimitri Shostakovich: Symphony No.9 in E Flat, Op.70, mvt. 3: Presto

St Petersburg Kirov Orchestra
Valery Gergiev

The ninth symphony was originally intended to be a celebration of the Russian victory over Nazi Germany in World War II (see Eastern Front). The composer declared in October 1943 that the symphony would be a large composition for orchestra, soloists and chorus “about the greatness of the Russian people, about our Red Army liberating our native land from the enemy”.

In a meeting with his students on 16 January 1945, Shostakovich informed them that the day before he had begun work on a new symphony. A week later, he told them that he had reached the middle of the development section, and the work was going to open with a big tutti. Isaak Glikman heard around ten minutes of the music Shostakovich had written for the first movement in late April, which he described as “majestic in scale, in pathos, in its breathtaking motion”. But then Shostakovich dropped the composition for three months. He resumed work on 26 July 1945 and finished on 30 August 1945. The symphony turned out to be a completely different work from the one he had originally planned, with neither soloists nor chorus and a much lighter mood. He forewarned listeners, “In character, the Ninth Symphony differs sharply from my preceding symphonies, the Seventh and the Eighth. If the Seventh and the Eighth symphonies bore a tragic-heroic character, then in the Ninth a transparent, pellucid, and bright mood predominates.”

(Source)

(via mozaertlich)

elvira:

houghtonlib:

"Escrime" Encyclopédie, ou Dictionnaire des sciences, 1751.
H 5690.799.60
Houghton Library, Harvard University

lots of love to the gifs from harvard

elvira:

houghtonlib:

"Escrime" Encyclopédie, ou Dictionnaire des sciences, 1751.

H 5690.799.60

Houghton Library, Harvard University

lots of love to the gifs from harvard

departured:

trendingly:

What Cities Would Look Like Without Lights

Click Here To See More!

omg this is so cool take a look 

(via nonnocelso)

megliotardi:

Era il 4 febbraio 1912 e tal Franz Reichelt decise di dimostrare al mondo che il suo paracadute funzionava, lanciandosi dalla Torre Eiffel.
Non gli andò benissimo…

che tensione